“Meet the Dullards” by Sara Pennypacker

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A boring book deserves a boring write-up. So, here we go, without further ado, meet the Dullards.

The Dullards’ child-rearing strategy was quite… boring. But kids don’t always listen to their parents and  Blanda, Borely, and Little Dud would sometimes come up with such crazy ideas like playing outside,  going to school or reading books. The Dullards couldn’t tolerate such behavior. If it wasn’t the genes, it must have been the place.  “It’s like a circus around here.” It was time to move somewhere duller. But nothing is perfect. Perfectly boring that is. Can you imagine a welcome by an excited neighbor with a chunky applesauce cake? However, even that couldn’t compare to the bright and flowery wallpaper….

Will the Dullards find a perfectly dull place to raise their children? Will the children keep trying to escape the monotony?

This book is so boring through and through. Dull pictures by Daniel Salmieri, uninteresting characters, dry humor… Add it all up and you’ve got an extra hilarious story! ( The exclamation mark is to annoy the Dullards). A story not only for children.

I don’t wish any child to be raised by the Dullards, but I think that a dull moment here and there would not be a bad idea for our over-scheduled and overstimulated kids. Let’s dare to be Dullards once in a while. Boredom can be good. Even inspiring. It can lead to creativity. Our bored kids can actually surprise us with something not so boring after all.

 

 

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“Is there a dog in this book?” by Viviane Schwarz

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You might think you have already seen everything from the world of tail tales.  After all, it’s been raining cats and dogs in kid lit for a while. But have you read “Is there a dog in this book?” by Viviane Schwarz? The furry pups and purry felines have never been more entertaining.

Andre, Moonpie and Tiny suspect there is an intruder in their book. A dog. The older cats know of dogs and they are dreading a potential encounter with the yappy, smelly, scary cat hater. They try to find a safe place to hide: behind a sofa, in the piano,  in a suitcase? As the fear of the dog grows in the older cats, so does the curiosity in Tiny. He wants to know what dog is. He wants to pet it. He finds is friendly. Thanks to brave little Tiny, Andre and Moonpie learn that even though they know of some dogs, they haven’t seen all dogs yet. Some dogs are soft, friendly and they love cats. But wait a minute… Where is that dog now? 

Next to bright, humorous illustrations, pages filled with inventive flaps, the book is written in the breaking the fourth wall format, to fully engage the reader in this hysterical hide-and-seek.

But it’s not only the humor that strikes me in this story. It’s more about what a serious message this amusing tale conveys. Andre and Moonpie show us so clearly that it is not always true that the older we grow the wiser we get. Our experiences often lead us to bias, bitterness and various prejudices. As a result we can’t see things with Tiny’s innocence and genuine curiosity. But perhaps we should try? Perhaps every now and then we should try to look at the world the way children do? They clearly have lots of fun exploring and gathering their own, positive, experiences. They can even teach us something new.

The other day, my three-year old taught me for example that if I dropped my IPhone into the bathtub filled with water, it would still work…  I thought otherwise but he proved me wrong. Yeah, I know, that’s not the lesson I had in mind…;-)

“Wolfie the Bunny” by Ame Dyckman

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As a big sister of three brothers, I used to struggle with my role as a child. Many a time did I wonder if we would ever connect as siblings. When I was in college, my two youngest brothers were finishing elementary school. I saw them a few times a year at most. But we did connect eventually. Now that we are all grown up, the age doesn’t matter and my brothers are beyond my siblings. They are my friends.

In other words, the thing with siblings is that, sooner or later, they will bond, despite all the rivalry, jealousy, age gap and different personality traits. As read and seen in “Wolfie The Bunny.

While the Bunny Mama and Papa are quite smitten with a new family member, baby wolf, Dot the big sister, just knows better: “He is going to eat us all up!” Wolfie’s growing appetite only confirms that the Bunny family will be next, after the carrots, which Wolfie can’t have enough. Just like he can’t have enough of Dot. He follows her everywhere, including the Carrot Patch, where Dot finally gets a chance to free herself from the unwanted helper. Yet, as the bear at the store tries to turn Wolfie into his dinner, brave Dot is the one to save him. And with what style!

A warm and reassuring story about family dynamics, siblings, adoption, veggies… engagingly and creatively illustrated by Zachariah Ohara. I love reading it with my little boys, who prove this book relatable and relevant on a daily basis.