“Infinity and Me” by Kate Hosford

Isn’t it interesting that the smallest number, zero, is not really a full-fledged number? You can’t count with it. And neither is the biggest number, infinity. You will never be able to count long enough to get there.  It must be sooooo abstract for children to grasp the idea of infinity or never-ending.  But we still can try to explain it to them using some more tangible and more familiar visuals. This is exactly what Uma did.

Uma started thinking about infinity when she was looking at the sky studded with stars. It seemed like there was about infinity of them.  The girl got intrigued by the concept and kept asking around. How did others imagine infinity? What did they think of when they heard infinity? As she found out, some  see a lounging number eight, others an endless list of numbers, or a noodle being halved endlessly. Her grandma saw a family tree, with all the great-grandparents and great- grandchildren. After the girl found out that infinity means forever, she wondered what thing she would like to do forever. Maybe to be eight forever? Or maybe to lick ice-cream forever?  She wasn’t sure. One thing was for sure, though. She loved her  grandma as much as infinity. And that was all that mattered.

What do your children think about when they hear infinity?  Just ask them to close their eyes and open the eyes of their imagination.  Reading the story first might be helpful and inspiring, especially that this poetic book is so imaginatively illustrated by Gabi Swiatkowska.

My son’s first encounter with the concept of infinity was… the car, Infinity. No wonder, he is a car maniac. We told him what the name, Infinity, meant and since then  infinity was his new standard. He was getting infinite joy from trying to run as fast as infinity or ride a scooter at the infinity per hour speed.  He even tried to top it with infinity+1. Go figure!